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  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • Every classroom is made up of individuals with diverse strengths, backgrounds, and approaches to learning. Understanding and responding to students' individual learning styles and needs can be a challenge for teachers. Participants in this workshop, Differentiating Instruction to Accommodate Learning Styles, will be introduced to learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as web-based resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • Every classroom is made up of individuals with diverse strengths, backgrounds, and approaches to learning. Understanding and responding to students' individual learning styles and needs can be a challenge for teachers. Participants in this workshop, Differentiating Instruction to Accommodate Learning Styles, will be introduced to learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as web-based resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.
  • The goal of the Integrating Technology Into Instruction module is to prepare you, as an educator, to be proficient with Standard V of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. Standard V focuses on the integration of technology into curriculum and instruction. It requires that teachers to be able to design, implement and assess learning experiences that incorporate the use of technology in a curriculum-related instructional activity to support understanding, inquiry, problem solving, communication, and/or collaboration.

  • In this workshop, participants will examine best practices for direct vocabulary instruction in order to build the breadth and depth of students? vocabulary for both comprehension and written expression in grades three through five. Participants will learn the importance of creating a word-conscious learning environment that encourages motivation and interest in learning new words. Participants will learn how to model and encourage independent word-learning strategies that students can apply while engaging in wide and varied reading. They will also explore the value of instructing students to infer the meaning of words from context and word parts. For their final project, participants will incorporate components of a balanced vocabulary program by designing a vocabulary lesson based on a classroom text - either fiction or non-fiction.

  • In this workshop, participants will examine best practices for direct vocabulary instruction in order to build the breadth and depth of students? vocabulary for both comprehension and written expression in grades three through five. Participants will learn the importance of creating a word-conscious learning environment that encourages motivation and interest in learning new words. Participants will learn how to model and encourage independent word-learning strategies that students can apply while engaging in wide and varied reading. They will also explore the value of instructing students to infer the meaning of words from context and word parts. For their final project, participants will incorporate components of a balanced vocabulary program by designing a vocabulary lesson based on a classroom text - either fiction or non-fiction.

  • The goal of the Integrating Technology Into Instruction module is to prepare you, as an educator, to be proficient with Standard V of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. Standard V focuses on the integration of technology into curriculum and instruction. It requires that teachers to be able to design, implement and assess learning experiences that incorporate the use of technology in a curriculum-related instructional activity to support understanding, inquiry, problem solving, communication, and/or collaboration.

  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • The Internet as we know it has been constantly changing and improving over the past several years and these changes have been so numerous and so dramatic as to inspire people to refer to this "new" internet as Web 2.0 or the Read/Write Web. The content of the Read/Write Web, as we will call it, is characterized by open communication, freedom to share and re-use content, and dynamic interactivity among users of varying technical abilities around the globe. There are now a multitude of web-based tools available that can allow people to organize their favorite bookmarks, write online documents, and share information with others through social software like blogs and wikis. These tools can positively impact teaching and learning and the implications are significant. Students can be empowered to see how their ideas can be shared easily with the world and students around the globe can easily collaborate and communicate with each other to build knowledge communities that are not dependent on time and space.

  • This online course, co-developed by EDC and CAST (Center for Applied Special Technologies), provides an introduction to the concept of Universal Design for Learning™ (UDL), its neurological basis, and strategies for a UDL approach in instructional settings. The basic premise of universal design for learning is that a curriculum should include alternatives to make it accessible and applicable to students, teachers, and parents with different backgrounds, learning styles, abilities, and disabilities in widely varied learning contexts. The online course is designed to acquaint participants with the basic premise of UDL, and to provide practical, hands on experience using software tools and digital media for learning support. It is designed for all those interested in educating diverse learners in general education classrooms: teachers, administrators, curriculum coordinators, technology specialists, and parents.

  • In this workshop, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios in classrooms. Participants will also be introduced to a wide variety of tools that can be used to create and assemble digital portfolios, and investigate criteria that may be used to select components that would be included in the portfolio. Participants will leave the workshop with detailed plans for implementing a Digital Portfolio Project in their respective classrooms.

  • In this workshop, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios in classrooms. Participants will also be introduced to a wide variety of tools that can be used to create and assemble digital portfolios, and investigate criteria that may be used to select components that would be included in the portfolio. Participants will leave the workshop with detailed plans for implementing a Digital Portfolio Project in their respective classrooms.

  • Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • This online course, co-developed by EDC and CAST (Center for Applied Special Technologies), provides an introduction to the concept of Universal Design for Learning™ (UDL), its neurological basis, and strategies for a UDL approach in instructional settings. The basic premise of universal design for learning is that a curriculum should include alternatives to make it accessible and applicable to students, teachers, and parents with different backgrounds, learning styles, abilities, and disabilities in widely varied learning contexts. The online course is designed to acquaint participants with the basic premise of UDL, and to provide practical, hands on experience using software tools and digital media for learning support. It is designed for all those interested in educating diverse learners in general education classrooms: teachers, administrators, curriculum coordinators, technology specialists, and parents.

  • The Internet as we know it has been constantly changing and improving over the past several years and these changes have been so numerous and so dramatic as to inspire people to refer to this "new" internet as Web 2.0 or the Read/Write Web. The content of the Read/Write Web, as we will call it, is characterized by open communication, freedom to share and re-use content, and dynamic interactivity among users of varying technical abilities around the globe. There are now a multitude of web-based tools available that can allow people to organize their favorite bookmarks, write online documents, and share information with others through social software like blogs and wikis. These tools can positively impact teaching and learning and the implications are significant. Students can be empowered to see how their ideas can be shared easily with the world and students around the globe can easily collaborate and communicate with each other to build knowledge communities that are not dependent on time and space.

  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • In this workshop, participants will examine best practices for direct vocabulary instruction in order to build the breadth and depth of students? vocabulary for both comprehension and written expression in grades three through five. Participants will learn the importance of creating a word-conscious learning environment that encourages motivation and interest in learning new words. Participants will learn how to model and encourage independent word-learning strategies that students can apply while engaging in wide and varied reading. They will also explore the value of instructing students to infer the meaning of words from context and word parts. For their final project, participants will incorporate components of a balanced vocabulary program by designing a vocabulary lesson based on a classroom text - either fiction or non-fiction.

  • In this workshop, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios in classrooms. Participants will also be introduced to a wide variety of tools that can be used to create and assemble digital portfolios, and investigate criteria that may be used to select components that would be included in the portfolio. Participants will leave the workshop with detailed plans for implementing a Digital Portfolio Project in their respective classrooms.

  • In this workshop, participants will explore the use of online resources to enhance inquiry-based teaching and learning in science. Over the course of this six session workshop, participants will become familiar with science-themed websites, online collaborative projects, science blogs and wikis, and the mapping applications Google Maps and Google Earth. Considerable attention is paid to helping participants identify ways that they can integrate these tools into their practice, and thus enrich their students’ engagement with science content. Promoting scientific inquiry is a central theme, and serves as a lens for this course. Participants consider the issue of assessment, specifically as it relates to inquiry and the use of online tools, later in the course. As a final project, participants develop plans for an inquiry-based science lesson that uses an Internet-based data source.

  • In this workshop, participants will explore the use of online resources to enhance inquiry-based teaching and learning in science. Over the course of this six session workshop, participants will become familiar with science-themed websites, online collaborative projects, science blogs and wikis, and the mapping applications Google Maps and Google Earth. Considerable attention is paid to helping participants identify ways that they can integrate these tools into their practice, and thus enrich their students’ engagement with science content. Promoting scientific inquiry is a central theme, and serves as a lens for this course. Participants consider the issue of assessment, specifically as it relates to inquiry and the use of online tools, later in the course. As a final project, participants develop plans for an inquiry-based science lesson that uses an Internet-based data source.

  • In this workshop, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios in classrooms. Participants will also be introduced to a wide variety of tools that can be used to create and assemble digital portfolios, and investigate criteria that may be used to select components that would be included in the portfolio. Participants will leave the workshop with detailed plans for implementing a Digital Portfolio Project in their respective classrooms.

  • The Internet as we know it has been constantly changing and improving over the past several years and these changes have been so numerous and so dramatic as to inspire people to refer to this "new" internet as Web 2.0 or the Read/Write Web. The content of the Read/Write Web, as we will call it, is characterized by open communication, freedom to share and re-use content, and dynamic interactivity among users of varying technical abilities around the globe. There are now a multitude of web-based tools available that can allow people to organize their favorite bookmarks, write online documents, and share information with others through social software like blogs and wikis. These tools can positively impact teaching and learning and the implications are significant. Students can be empowered to see how their ideas can be shared easily with the world and students around the globe can easily collaborate and communicate with each other to build knowledge communities that are not dependent on time and space. A few dedicated educators are sharing their ideas and blogging about these new tools so that they can be used effectively in classrooms.

  • Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • In this workshop, participants will examine best practices for direct vocabulary instruction in order to build the breadth and depth of students? vocabulary for both comprehension and written expression in grades three through five. Participants will learn the importance of creating a word-conscious learning environment that encourages motivation and interest in learning new words. Participants will learn how to model and encourage independent word-learning strategies that students can apply while engaging in wide and varied reading. They will also explore the value of instructing students to infer the meaning of words from context and word parts. For their final project, participants will incorporate components of a balanced vocabulary program by designing a vocabulary lesson based on a classroom text - either fiction or non-fiction.

  • This online course, co-developed by EDC and CAST (Center for Applied Special Technologies), provides an introduction to the concept of Universal Design for Learning™ (UDL), its neurological basis, and strategies for a UDL approach in instructional settings. The basic premise of universal design for learning is that a curriculum should include alternatives to make it accessible and applicable to students, teachers, and parents with different backgrounds, learning styles, abilities, and disabilities in widely varied learning contexts. The online course is designed to acquaint participants with the basic premise of UDL, and to provide practical, hands on experience using software tools and digital media for learning support. It is designed for all those interested in educating diverse learners in general education classrooms: teachers, administrators, curriculum coordinators, technology specialists, and parents.

  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • The goal of the Integrating Technology Into Instruction module is to prepare you, as an educator, to be proficient with Standard V of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. Standard V focuses on the integration of technology into curriculum and instruction. It requires that teachers to be able to design, implement and assess learning experiences that incorporate the use of technology in a curriculum-related instructional activity to support understanding, inquiry, problem solving, communication, and/or collaboration.

  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • In this workshop, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios in classrooms. Participants will also be introduced to a wide variety of tools that can be used to create and assemble digital portfolios, and investigate criteria that may be used to select components that would be included in the portfolio. Participants will leave the workshop with detailed plans for implementing a Digital Portfolio Project in their respective classrooms.

  • This online course, co-developed by EDC and CAST (Center for Applied Special Technologies), provides an introduction to the concept of Universal Design for Learning™ (UDL), its neurological basis, and strategies for a UDL approach in instructional settings. The basic premise of universal design for learning is that a curriculum should include alternatives to make it accessible and applicable to students, teachers, and parents with different backgrounds, learning styles, abilities, and disabilities in widely varied learning contexts. The online course is designed to acquaint participants with the basic premise of UDL, and to provide practical, hands on experience using software tools and digital media for learning support. It is designed for all those interested in educating diverse learners in general education classrooms: teachers, administrators, curriculum coordinators, technology specialists, and parents.

  • In this workshop, participants will examine best practices for direct vocabulary instruction in order to build the breadth and depth of students? vocabulary for both comprehension and written expression in grades three through five. Participants will learn the importance of creating a word-conscious learning environment that encourages motivation and interest in learning new words. Participants will learn how to model and encourage independent word-learning strategies that students can apply while engaging in wide and varied reading. They will also explore the value of instructing students to infer the meaning of words from context and word parts. For their final project, participants will incorporate components of a balanced vocabulary program by designing a vocabulary lesson based on a classroom text - either fiction or non-fiction.

  • Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • Fall 2013 Learning and Teaching with Web 2.0 Tools

  • Fall 2013 Making the Most of Adolescent Literature

  • Fall 2013 Using Technology in the Elementary Mathematics Classroom

  • UDLnewfile

  • The Internet has been changing and improving in dramatic ways over the past several years, inspiring the concept of a "new" internet known as Web 2.0 or the Read/Write Web. The content of the Read/Write Web, as we will call it, is characterized by open communication, freedom to share and re-use content, and dynamic interactivity among users of varying technical abilities around the globe. There are now a multitude of web-based tools available that can allow people to organize their favorite bookmarks, write online documents, and share information with others through social software like blogs and wikis. These tools can positively impact teaching and learning and the implications are significant. Students can be empowered to see how their ideas can be shared easily with the world and students around the globe can easily collaborate and communicate with each other to build knowledge communities that are not dependent on time and space. A few dedicated educators are sharing their ideas and blogging about these new tools so that they can be used effectively in classrooms. In this workshop, participants will be exposed to many of the tools of the Read/Write Web and will get the chance to experiment with new tools each week. The final session will focus on how educators can help students to use these new tools safely. Discussions will help participants focus on how these tools can be integrated into the classroom to make the most of their potential to enhance student learning.

  • This online course, co-developed by EDC and CAST (Center for Applied Special Technologies), provides an introduction to the concept of Universal Design for Learning™ (UDL), its neurological basis, and strategies for a UDL approach in instructional settings. The basic premise of universal design for learning is that a curriculum should include alternatives to make it accessible and applicable to students, teachers, and parents with different backgrounds, learning styles, abilities, and disabilities in widely varied learning contexts. The online course is designed to acquaint participants with the basic premise of UDL, and to provide practical, hands on experience using software tools and digital media for learning support. It is designed for all those interested in educating diverse learners in general education classrooms: teachers, administrators, curriculum coordinators, technology specialists, and parents.

  • In this workshop, participants will take an in-depth look at the power of digital portfolios as a tool to document student learning through exploring various formats and uses of digital portfolios in classrooms. Participants will also be introduced to a wide variety of tools that can be used to create and assemble digital portfolios, and investigate criteria that may be used to select components that would be included in the portfolio. Participants will leave the workshop with detailed plans for implementing a Digital Portfolio Project in their respective classrooms.

  • Addressing the individual learning styles of students can be a challenge for teachers. The World Wide Web contains a vast number of resources to assist teachers in understanding and planning for the different avenues through which students learn best. Participants in this workshop will review a range of web sites providing information about learning theory related to learning styles and multiple intelligences, as well as resources to assist teachers in both identifying students' learning styles and intelligences and engaging students in activities which best suit those styles and intelligences. Participants will become familiar with teaching strategies and tools targeted for each learning style and intelligence and develop a preliminary lesson plan using those strategies and tools.

  • In this workshop, participants will explore new technologies that can be used in elementary math instruction in kindergarten through sixth grade. Participants will review NCTM and state standards and examine the ways in which tools like virtual manipulatives, calculators, spreadsheet programs, online data sources, and applets can support these goals. In particular, the workshop will address ways in which technology can support elementary algebra, geometry, number and operation, and data analysis standards. Participants will leave the workshop with a lesson plan that integrates a new technology into instruction in their own classrooms.

  • In this workshop, participants will examine best practices for direct vocabulary instruction in order to build the breadth and depth of students? vocabulary for both comprehension and written expression in grades three through five. Participants will learn the importance of creating a word-conscious learning environment that encourages motivation and interest in learning new words. Participants will learn how to model and encourage independent word-learning strategies that students can apply while engaging in wide and varied reading. They will also explore the value of instructing students to infer the meaning of words from context and word parts. For their final project, participants will incorporate components of a balanced vocabulary program by designing a vocabulary lesson based on a classroom text - either fiction or non-fiction.

  • In this workshop, participants will explore the use of online resources to enhance inquiry-based teaching and learning in science. Over the course of this six session workshop, participants will become familiar with science-themed websites, online collaborative projects, science blogs and wikis, and the mapping applications Google Maps and Google Earth. Considerable attention is paid to helping participants identify ways that they can integrate these tools into their practice, and thus enrich their students’ engagement with science content. Promoting scientific inquiry is a central theme, and serves as a lens for this course. Participants consider the issue of assessment, specifically as it relates to inquiry and the use of online tools, later in the course. As a final project, participants develop plans for an inquiry-based science lesson that uses an Internet-based data source.

  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • The goal of the Information Access, Evaluation, Processing and Application module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard 1 of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the accessing, evaluating, processing and applying information efficiently and effectively and is based on the NETS for Teachers:  National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers.

  • The goal of the Digital Citizenship module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard III of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards. This standard requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use.

  • The goal of the Communication module is to prepare you, as an educator, to become proficient with Standard II of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards referencing Communication issues. This standard requires teachers to demonstrate an understanding of the effective and appropriate use of electronic communication, and to use technology to communicate information in a variety of formats. It also requires that teachers demonstrate an understanding of the legal, social, and ethical issues related to technology use. This module is based on the NETS for Teachers: National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers, Second Edition ©2008, ISTE® (International Society for Technology in Education), www.iste.org . All rights reserved.

  • The goal of the Assessement for Administration and Instruction module is to prepare you, as an educator, to be proficient with Standard IV of the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards, which references using data to develop solutions for both instructional and school improvement purposes.

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